Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith Plans 2020 Kickoff With High-Dollar Donors

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Just months after winning the most closely contested U.S. Senate race in Mississippi since the 1980s, U.S. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith plans to kick off her 2020 re-election bid next month with a high-dollar fundraiser in Washington, D.C.

In an invitation sent out to select supporters for a fundraiser with the National Republican Senatorial Committee PAC, Hyde-Smith requests a minimum $1,000 contribution per attendee. To become a sponsor, attendees can make a $2,500 PAC contribution. A $5,000 PAC donation, meanwhile, gets contributors dubbed a "co-host" and a "Senator's Circle Membership."

GOP Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will join the Mississippi Republican for the April 2 kickoff at the National Republican Senatorial Committee headquarters, as will fellow Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker.

The invitation lists other GOP "special guests," including several U.S. senators: Todd Young of Indiana; Joni Ernst of Iowa; Roy Blunt of Missouri; John Barasso of Wyoming; and John Thune of South Dakota

Last August, the Jackson Free Press reported that Wicker, too, held a fundraiser with requested contributions for couples ranging from $1,000 to $5,000. Joining him there was Karl Rove, who served as a political strategist and senior adviser to President George W. Bush in the early 2000s.

Haley Barbour's Russia-Linked Firm Hosted GOP Fundraiser

Just last month, Wicker joined McConnell as a special guest at an NRSC kickoff fundraiser hosted the BGR Group hosted at its Washington, D.C., office. That fundraiser required a minimum $5,000 individual donation and $15,000 PAC donation to attend.

"Contributions up to $233,800 accepted," a leaked invitation posted at politicalpartytime.org reads.

Former Mississippi GOP Gov. Haley Barbour founded the BGR Group, which stands for Barbour, Griffith and Rogers. He left the firm to serve his two terms as governor, but returned to help run it in 2012.

The BGR Group has ties to Russian government figures and companies, some of them swept

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