Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Mississippi Center for Public Policy

What are the policy implications from Tuesday’s elections?

Mississippi did not join most states in holding statewide elections on Tuesday. That will be next year when every statewide, legislative, and county office...

Tupelo food truck regulations don’t include controversial restrictions

After a great deal of debate and discussion over the past year, the new food truck regulations in Tupelo do not include the controversial,...

Mississippi needs economic growth; not economic development

Economic development, incentives via the government, and economic growth, based on free market principles, should not be confused. Well-meaning public officials, government employees, community...

Airbnb collects $1 million in taxes

Popular homesharing site Airbnb announced that they recently remitted $1 million in taxes to the state of Mississippi. Since September 2017, Airbnb has been...

Freedom Minute: Food truck regulations

In this edition of Freedom Minute, we talk about why food truck regulations are not only bad for consumers and the local economy, they...

Unfortunately for Mississippi, Americans move to low tax states

Few people would argue with the beauty of a California sunset. The bright lights of Times Square are tough to compete with. But there...

Mississippi continues to lag in freedom

Mississippi’s freedom ranking moved up a couple spots from the previous year while our overall score actually declined slightly. Fraser Institute’s “Economic Freedom of...

These Halloween laws are just plain scary

As children in Mississippi and around the country prepare for a night of trick-or-treating, they may unknowingly run afoul with local laws. These aren’t...

MCPP voices support for First Step Act

Mississippi Center for Public Policy recently added their name in support of the First Step Act. The First Step Act will provide meaningful reform...

The decision on food trucks belongs to the customers

Food truck regulations around the country continue to be challenged in court because they are indefensible from a legal perspective. If Tupelo leaders continue...